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Thread: Let's Talk about Blackstrap Coffee...

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    Let's Talk about Blackstrap Coffee...

    I did a little digging, but didn't really find as much information as i'd like. Looks like a specific kind of molasses was added to coffee by miners, and I'd imagine this was due to the expensive cost, and/or difficulty to obtain, at the time.

    My question is: Does anyone (devs included, since you made me wonder about this!) actually know the recipe is for said coffee? Kind of beans used, any other things put in the coffee, the actual amount of molasses used per cup?

    I'd like to actually try this out, and i know blackstrap molasses is easy to find, even at some big box stores.

    Thanks everyone!

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    I can answer this! I have family that went from mining to logging and would make blackstrap every morning. It's not a big deal; just make really strong coffee and put a drizzle of blackstrap molasses in it. Like just a bit, and a bit of cream or half and half.

    Blackstrap isn't sweet. Not really. It is a bit but it's salty and bitter more than sweet. I spent two winters driving skidder and would drink a cup in the morning. Honestly it's pretty terrible and it's mostly about 'I hate myself so much that I'm waking up at 4am to drive a skidder up a Wyoming mountainside in below zero temperatures for ♥♥♥♥ pay. I deserve to have particularly terrible tasting coffee to get myself going'.

    Sorta like Scottish food. It seems like it was made on a dare and consumed just to prove how hardcore you are.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grieferbastard View Post
    I can answer this! I have family that went from mining to logging and would make blackstrap every morning. It's not a big deal; just make really strong coffee and put a drizzle of blackstrap molasses in it. Like just a bit, and a bit of cream or half and half.

    Blackstrap isn't sweet. Not really. It is a bit but it's salty and bitter more than sweet. I spent two winters driving skidder and would drink a cup in the morning. Honestly it's pretty terrible and it's mostly about 'I hate myself so much that I'm waking up at 4am to drive a skidder up a Wyoming mountainside in below zero temperatures for ♥♥♥♥ pay. I deserve to have particularly terrible tasting coffee to get myself going'.

    Sorta like Scottish food. It seems like it was made on a dare and consumed just to prove how hardcore you are.

    Fair enough, thanks for the info! I may have to rethink testing this IRL then. I had mentioned it to a friend who wants to start a coffee shop also, she wanted to know if it was something that could be marketed.

    Dunno, maybe...if someone wanted to test their might or whatnot.

    Thanks again for the info, much appreciated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grieferbastard View Post
    I can answer this! I have family that went from mining to logging and would make blackstrap every morning. It's not a big deal; just make really strong coffee and put a drizzle of blackstrap molasses in it. Like just a bit, and a bit of cream or half and half.

    Blackstrap isn't sweet. Not really. It is a bit but it's salty and bitter more than sweet. I spent two winters driving skidder and would drink a cup in the morning. Honestly it's pretty terrible and it's mostly about 'I hate myself so much that I'm waking up at 4am to drive a skidder up a Wyoming mountainside in below zero temperatures for ♥♥♥♥ pay. I deserve to have particularly terrible tasting coffee to get myself going'.

    Sorta like Scottish food. It seems like it was made on a dare and consumed just to prove how hardcore you are.
    I was going to take offence because I love Scottish food but... yeah, most people see it that way. I'll defend haggis with my life though

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sawth77 View Post
    Fair enough, thanks for the info! I may have to rethink testing this IRL then. I had mentioned it to a friend who wants to start a coffee shop also, she wanted to know if it was something that could be marketed.

    Dunno, maybe...if someone wanted to test their might or whatnot.

    Thanks again for the info, much appreciated.
    Market it as getting back to the roots of the pioneers/whatever that first settled the area. People love that sort of thing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grieferbastard View Post
    I can answer this! I have family that went from mining to logging and would make blackstrap every morning. It's not a big deal; just make really strong coffee and put a drizzle of blackstrap molasses in it. Like just a bit, and a bit of cream or half and half.

    Blackstrap isn't sweet. Not really. It is a bit but it's salty and bitter more than sweet. I spent two winters driving skidder and would drink a cup in the morning. Honestly it's pretty terrible and it's mostly about 'I hate myself so much that I'm waking up at 4am to drive a skidder up a Wyoming mountainside in below zero temperatures for ♥♥♥♥ pay. I deserve to have particularly terrible tasting coffee to get myself going'.

    Sorta like Scottish food. It seems like it was made on a dare and consumed just to prove how hardcore you are.
    I'm in Nashville and this makes me think about hot chicken so much. It's literally a contest of who can make/eat the spiciest chicken without dying.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The-Walking-Dad View Post
    Market it as getting back to the roots of the pioneers/whatever that first settled the area. People love that sort of thing.
    That was my thought actually. Between that and a fair number of people wanting to move away from processed sugar while retaining some sweetness, I think there's a way we might be able to make it work. Just have to find a good, yet still basically authentic, way of doing it.

    Also, Shillen, totally know what you mean. Lived in Murfreesburo for a while, got to see people at work do that quite a few times LOL.

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