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Thread: SUPPORT FAQ: Information and Common Solutions

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    Last edited by SylenThunder; 02-09-2018 at 10:50 PM.

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    Community Moderator SylenThunder's Avatar
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    Cool Please Read This First

    I'd like to start this with a little note.

    While most of this data is correct, and I try to keep it updated as best as I can, the game is still in the Alpha stages. Things may change. Sometimes they can change drastically before I have a chance to get out here and make updates. Just keep that in mind please.

    This is a collection of data that is designed to assist you as a whole. Whether trying to figure out why you're having an issue, or looking for some general information. It has been kind of tossed together, and I do have plans to get it better organized. That just requires a lot of free time I haven't had yet.

    If you see something off, or it is horribly wrong, feel free to shoot me a PM and I will take a look into it.
    Oh, and a final note... The order is a bit jumbled at the moment. I need to clean it up and re-organize things.
    Last edited by SylenThunder; 02-09-2018 at 10:04 PM.

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    What are the system requirements for the game?

    Currently minimum and recommended system requirements are as follows (though subject to change):
    NOTE: This is a little more up-to-date than what is listed on the Support page.


    Windows Minimum (It should play, but it won't be very enjoyable.)

    • OS: Windows 7 (64-bit is recommended)
    • Processor: 2.4 Ghz Dual Core CPU
    • Memory: 8GB RAM
    • Graphics: 1GB Dedicated Memory*
    • Direct X: Version 10
    • Network: Broadband internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 8 GB available space
    • Sound Card: Direct X compatible


    Windows Minimum Recommended (It should play mostly ok.)

    • OS: Windows 7 or 10
    • Processor: 2.4 Ghz Dual Core Cpu
    • Memory: 12GB RAM
    • Graphics: 2GB Dedicated Memory*
    • Direct X: Version 11
    • Network: Broadband internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 15 GB available space
    • Sound Card: Direct X compatible


    Windows Recommended


    • OS: Windows 7 or Higher
    • Processor: 3.2 Ghz Quad Core CPU or faster
    • Memory: 16 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 4 GB Dedicated Memory*
    • Direct X: Version 11
    • Network: Broadband internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 15 GB available space
    • Sound Card: Direct X compatible


    Mac Minimum

    • OS: 10.6
    • Processor: 2.4 Ghz Dual Core Cpu
    • Memory: 8GB RAM
    • Graphics: 1GB Dedicated Memory
    • Direct X: Version 10
    • Network: Broadband internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 8 GB available space


    Mac Recommended


    • OS: 10.9
    • Processor: 3.0 Ghz Quad Core CPU or faster
    • Memory: 12 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 2 GB Dedicated Memory
    • Direct X: Version 10
    • Network: Broadband internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 15 GB available space


    Linux/Steam OS Minimum


    • OS: Ubuntu 12.04
    • Processor: 2.4 Ghz Dual Core Cpu (SSE3 for 64-bit client)
    • Memory: 8GB RAM
    • Graphics: 512 Dedicated Memory*
    • Direct X: Version 10
    • Network: Broadband internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 8 GB available space


    Linux/Steam OS
    Recommended


    • OS: Ubuntu 14.04
    • Processor: 3.0 Ghz Quad Core CPU or faster
    • Memory: 12 GB RAM
    • Graphics: 2 GB Dedicated Memory*
    • Direct X: Version 10
    • Network: Broadband internet connection
    • Hard Drive: 15 GB available space


    Additional Notes



    Running the Dedicated Server and Client on the same computer will double ram requirements, and put a heavier load on your CPU. Also future releases may require more hard drive space.

    * For GPU reference, I am currently assuming a Geforce 650 or equivalent for minimum, and a GTX 660 Ti or higher for recommended.
    Last edited by SylenThunder; 09-01-2019 at 10:53 PM.

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    What are the system requirements for a dedicated server?

    They are basically the same as the client, but you don't need a GPU for it. Also, I think the hardware differences don't really matter as much since any server-level platform is going to be similarly geared.

    Minimum 32-bit

    • Processor: 2.4 Ghz Dual Core Cpu (SSE2 capable)
    • Memory: 4GB RAM
    • Network: Broadband internet connection (minimum upload bandwidth of 1Mbps recommended)
    • Hard Drive: 3 GB available space


    Minimum 64-bit

    • Processor: 2.4 Ghz Dual Core Cpu (SSE3 capable)
    • Memory: 4GB RAM
    • Network: Broadband internet connection (minimum upload bandwidth of 1Mbps recommended)
    • Hard Drive: 3 GB available space


    Recommended 32-bit


    • Processor: 3.0 Ghz Quad Core CPU or faster (SSE2 capable)
    • Memory: 6 GB RAM
    • Network: Broadband internet connection (minimum upload bandwidth of 3Mbps recommended)
    • Hard Drive: 3 GB available space


    Recommended 64-bit

    • Processor: 3.0 Ghz Quad Core CPU or faster (SSE3 capable)
    • Memory: 6 GB RAM
    • Network: Broadband internet connection (minimum upload bandwidth of 3Mbps recommended)
    • Hard Drive: 3 GB available space


    NOTE:
    The more people you have connecting to your server, the more bandwidth and RAM you will need available.
    Also note that you may need up to 15GB of drive space for a large RWG map, the client, and a large amount of player data.


    Additionally, you will need to open the following ports in your firewall.

    TCP

    • 8080-8081 (ONLY if you plan to administer your server remotely.)
    • 8082 (If you are using Alloc's mods, this is for the web map.)
    • 26900


    UDP

    • 26900-26903


    Required Ports for Steam

    • To log into Steam and download content:
      • HTTP (TCP port 80) and HTTPS (443)
      • UDP 27015 through 27030
      • TCP 27015 through 27030

    • Steam Client
      • UDP 27000 to 27015 inclusive (Game client traffic)
      • UDP 27015 to 27030 inclusive (Typically Matchmaking and HLTV)
      • UDP 27031 and 27036 (incoming, for In-Home Streaming)
      • TCP 27036 and 27037 (incoming, for In-Home Streaming)
      • UDP 4380

    • Dedicated or Listen Servers
      • TCP 27015 (SRCDS Rcon port)

    • Steamworks P2P Networking and Steam Voice Chat
      • UDP 3478 (Outbound)
      • UDP 4379 (Outbound)
      • UDP 4380 (Outbound)


    Lastly, don't forget to set up port forwarding on your router.

    Don't know how to port forward? follow these instructions:

    1. Go to this Site.
    2. Select your router brand
    3. Select your router version. (If your version is not there, pick the one closest to your version.)
    4. Select 7 Days to Die.
    5. Follow the instructions on the site.



    Port Default Protocol Direction Used for
    BasePort+0 26900 UDP In Game (Steam's master server list interface)
    BasePort+1 26901 UDP In Game (Steam communication)
    BasePort+2 26902 UDP In Game (networking via RakNet)
    BasePort+3 26903 UDP In Game (networking via UNET)
    BasePort 26900 TCP In Game (Game details query port)
    WebControlPort 8080 TCP In Web based control panel
    TelnetPort 8081 TCP In "Telnet" control interface
    WebControlPort+2 8082 TCP In Web Panel of the Server fixes
    270xx UDP Out Registering at the server list
    Last edited by SylenThunder; 12-20-2018 at 12:52 AM. Reason: Updated ports

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    What effect does each video option have?


    Display Resolution: Sets the screen resolution at which the game is displayed.
    Performance Impact: Very High
    Larger resolutions will decrease your performance.
    Fullscreen: Run the game in fullscreen or windowed mode.
    Performance Impact: Medium
    Windowed mode will have a negative impact on performance in most operating systems.
    Vertical Synchronization: Combats screen tearing by synchronizing the game to the monitors refresh rate.
    Performance Impact: Low
    This is a great option to cap the FPS of the game at the FPS for your monitor.
    Anti- Aliasing: Removes jagged edges from objects.
    Performance Impact: Medium
    I would only recommend using this options on a higher-end card.
    Texture Quality: Saves video memory and performance by setting the texture resolution.
    Performance Impact: Medium
    Reflection Quality: How clear reflections are. Provides more realistic lighting.
    Performance Impact: Very High
    At the time of this writing, "Very High" is a bit of an understatement. This feature still needs to be optimized better.

    Reflected Shadows: Shadows are processed and displayed inside reflections.
    Performance Impact: High

    Water Quality: Layers and effects occurring on surface of water planes.
    Performance Impact: Low
    Low quality water is very dark and difficult to see through.

    Gamma: How bright the game is.
    Performance Impact: Low

    View Distance: How far the world can me viewed.
    Performance Impact: High

    Field of View: How wide your view angle is.
    Performance Impact: Low
    Higher settings can cause a "fisheye" look with curving at the outer edges of the screen.

    Level of Detail: The overall maximum level of detail at which the world is displayed. As you move further away from an object, it switches to a lower quality version of the mesh
    Performance Impact: High
    Lower values decrease quality of distanced textures and improve performance.

    Shadow Distance: Quality and distance of object shadows.
    Performance Impact: High
    This is the second largest item that affects overall performance on most mid/low-range cards.

    Tree Quality: Overall quality of the trees based on how far away they are.
    Performance Impact: High
    Setting this lower than high will cause distant trees to render as stick poles until you get into closer range. (Like LOD for trees)

    Grass Distance: The maximum distance at which you can see grass.
    Performance Impact: Medium

    Motion Blur: Quality level of motion blur (more pixel samples & smoothing).
    Performance Impact: High

    UI Background Opacity: UI wallpaper / background opacity / transparency.
    Performance Impact: Very Low

    UI Foreground Opacity: UI outlines and text opacity / transparency.
    Performance Impact: Very Low

    SSAO (Screen Space Ambient Occlusion): Use the image effect SSAO which draws more detailed shadows on objects.
    Performance Impact: Medium

    DOF (Depth of Field): Distant objects get blurred.
    Performance impact: Medium
    Can help to obfuscate a low LOD setting without as large of an impact on performance as a high LOD.

    Sun Shafts: A.K.A. "God Rays". Shines rays of light from the sun past obstructing objects.
    Performance Impact: Medium


    Author's note: With the above settings I get a very solid 60 FPS with an i7 3930k, and a GTX 660 Ti.
    Last edited by SylenThunder; 01-14-2018 at 05:51 PM. Reason: Updated image

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    What is the difference between a Voxel game, and all the other games I play?

    Before Voxel games, just about everything out there is just polygons on vertexes. Polygons are easy to lay out, and overall the only real overhead you have with it depends on the size and resolution of the textures.

    Polygon technology (Most non-voxel games)

    Imagine three points in space. Join them up with lines to form a triangle, then fill that triangle in red. Congratulations, you've just rendered a polygon in the same way a graphics card does!

    Essentially, this is how polygon graphics work: joining lots of points in space (vertexes) together, and filling the space between them (polygons) with colors (textures).

    If we were to make a cube, we'd need 8 vertexes (the corners), and fill the space between them with six four-sided polygons. We never "see" vertexes – they're just the points in space, we only see the polygons between them.

    Here's a video of how texture painting on vertexes/polygons works:


    Polygon meshes are the most flexible and precise way of storing and rendering terrain. They are often used in games where precise control or advanced terrain features are needed.

    Pros:

    • Very fast: You only have to do the usual projection calculation in the vertex shader. A geometry shader isn't needed.
    • Very precise: All coordinates are store individually for each vertex, so it's possible to move them horizontally and increase mesh density in places with finer details.
    • Low memory impact: This also means the mesh will usually need less memory than a heightmap, because vertices can be more sparse in areas with less small features.
    • No artifacts: The mesh is rendered as-is, so there won't be any glitches or strange-looking borders.
    • Advanced terrain features: It's possible to leave holes and create overhangs. Tunnels are seamless.

    Cons:

    • Poor dynamic LOD: Only possible with pre-computed meshes. This will cause "jumps" when switching without additional data to map old to new vertices.
    • Not easy to modify: Finding vertices that correspond to an area that should be modified is slow.
    • Not very efficient for collision detection: Unlike in heightmaps and voxel data, the memory address for a certain location usually can't be calculated directly. This means physics and game logic that depend on the exact surface geometry will most likely run slower than with the other storage formats.


    Voxel technology (7DTD, Landmark, Minecraft, ect.)

    Voxel technology basically says: we want points in space that we can see. Voxels can be thought of as being visible points in 3d space, and are somewhat analgous to a 2-dimensional pixel.

    Additionally, voxels can contain properties in much the way vertexes do and (depending on the engine and environment) can serve to decrease graphics acceleration requirements. These advantages aren't free, though.

    Voxel terrain stores terrain data for each point in a 3D grid. This method always uses the most storage per meaningful surface detail, even if you use compression methods like sparse octrees.

    (The term "voxel engine" was often used to describe a method of ray marching terrain heightmaps common in older 3D games. This section applies only to terrain stored as voxel data.)

    Pros:

    • Continuous 3D data: Voxels are pretty much the only efficient way to store continuous data about hidden terrain features like ore veins.
    • Easy to modify: Uncompressed voxel data can be changed easily.
    • Advanced terrain features: It's possible to create overhangs. Tunnels are seamless.
    • Interesting terrain generation: Minecraft does this by overlaying noise functions and gradients with predefined terrain features (trees, dungeons).

    Cons:

    • Slow: To render voxel data, you either have to use a ray tracer or compute a mesh, for example with marching cubes (There will be artifacts). Neighboring voxel aren't independent for mesh generation and the shaders are more complicated and usually produce more complex geometry. Rendering voxel data with high LOD can be very slow.
    • Huge storage requirements: Storing voxel data uses lots of memory. It's often not practicable to load the voxel data into VRAM for this reason, as you'd have to use smaller textures to compensate for it, even on modern hardware.


    ~Source1
    ~Source2
    Last edited by SylenThunder; 04-18-2016 at 10:58 PM.

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    Why do I get such low FPS on this when I can play _______ just fine at full settings?

    There are two very big reasons behind this.

    The first is the very nature of Voxel games. Rather than just displaying 2D images onto 3D planes that are fixed and don't require any additional calculations; the voxel game is constantly keeping track of position, texture, and stats for every single block in your range of view.

    The second is simply optimization. This game is still in the Alpha state. Optimization is something that is incomplete, and still being worked on. As features get added, changed, or removed, it changes the overall balance, and then things have to be optimized all over again.

    As the game gets closer to a final release, you will see a lot more work being put into overall optimization, and performance will very likely improve significantly.

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    How to install and use the 32-bit client for low-end PC's

    For Windows user running a 64 bit version of the system.
    You can use the game launcher to try downloading the 32 bit version of the game and check if that runs any different.
    This is also very helpful for those with less than 12GB RAM, dual-core or low-end CPU's, or if you are using a GPU rated below a GTX650/Radeon 7790.
    NOTE: The minimum requirement is 6GB RAM as of a16. If you have less, you need to upgrade.


    1. Right-click the game in your Steam Library
    2. Select Show Game Launcher from the menu
    3. When the launcher opens select Switch to 32-bit
    4. Select Run & Save as default
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by SylenThunder; 02-09-2018 at 10:00 PM. Reason: Updated steps for new version

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    What is EAC, and why do I want it?

    EAC is an anti-cheat engine. It's primarily used my dedicated servers to prevent hackers from joining and causing problems. The system isn't 100% effective, because hackers can be darn smart, but it does keep most of the riff-raff out.

    If you are planning on joining a server that has the EAc client protection turned on, you will need to launch the game with EAC. One thing to be aware of, is that when launching with EAC, the game will take considerably longer to load as EAC must check and verify the integrity of the client files to ensure that they meet the checksums. On an average system, this can change the client startup time from 30 seconds to a couple of minutes.

    Also I should mention, EAC will use more system resources and may impact your performance if you are on a moderate or low-end system.

    If you wish to disable it, simply follow the above instructions and un-tick the option for EAC.
    Last edited by SylenThunder; 08-06-2017 at 02:45 PM.

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    EAC Basic Troubleshooting steps

    Now you want to play that server, and it's got EAC enabled. For some reason, every time you start the client with EAC it crashes. Here's some things that may help get you running again.

    1. System Specs
    If you are running at the minimum recommended specs or below, it may just be a lack of available system resources.
    In this particular case, running the 32-bit client may resolve your issue.

    2. Launch error : Error validating EasyAntiCheat code signing certificate.
    This is most common when you are not up-to-date on Windows Updates, and your Certificate Store is outdated.
    To resolve the issue, fully update Windows and try again. You may also need to fully exclude your game client from your Antivirus software.
    As a final resort you could try to manually import the GlobalSign "CodeSign" and "EV CodeSign" Root Certificates from https://support.globalsign.com/custo...t-certificates

    3. Kicked from server, or unable to join. EAC disconnected from server/backend error.
    There are a few things that can cause this to occur.


    1. Your antivirus software is delaying the data.
      • The most common fix for this is to exclude the client folder from your antivirus software's active and passive scans.

    2. Your firewall is blocking/delaying the data packets.
      • Very much like the issue with antivirus software, you will need to add a rule to your firewall for the games .exe files.

    3. Network hardware driver issues.
      • Thank you to Almanac for finding this fix. After doing all the usual troubleshooting, he discovered that the issue was caused by an out-dated driver for his network adapter.

    4. You're on bad Wifi.
      • Yes, wifi is getting much faster, and can do a lot more. Unfortunately, most people don't have a good AC router with 6 antennas and a PC with dual-antenna support to take full advantage of it. That isn't even counting the 300 other things that can be causing interference, or completely interrupting your signal.


    4.
    Last edited by SylenThunder; 04-25-2016 at 01:59 PM.

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    Community Moderator SylenThunder's Avatar
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    Why are you telling me to exclude the program from my Antivirus software?

    Antivirus software is a must-have in today's age of computing if your PC is attached to the internet at all. (Some will argue otherwise, but for 95% of PC users this is a simple fact.)
    Unfortunately, the scans that it runs on active processes can have an negative impact in your game clients performance. Since we trust Steam, and their vetting process, to prevent us from being sent malware through games we purchase, we can safely trust them as a publisher. As such, I recommend excluding the entire Steam folder rather than just your 7DaysToDie folder under SeamApps\Common.
    In fact, I keep all of my games from trusted publishers in a "Games" folder, and have excluded that entire folder. Steam, Origin, and other such tools all reside inside of this folder, along with individually purchased games from other companies I trust.

    How to exclude the program from your Antivirus software.
    Truly, the biggest hurdle in doing this is figuring out how to perform the exclusion in your particular software. As such, I have compiled a list of the top 10 Antivirus solutions and am providing links to their instructions. Microsoft Security Essentials does not make the top 10 by any stretch, but I'll include it just because it is common if you haven't purchased a real AV solution.

    1. BitDefenter (#1 for 4 years straight BTW)
    2. Kaspersky (Used to be that Kaspersky and AVG were heavy contenders for #1 and #2, but Kaspersky has held #2 solid for a while.)
    3. McAffee
    4. Norton (Page 44)
    5. F-Secure
    6. Avira
    7. Panda (It's from 2012, but it's the best they have available)
    8. Trend Micro
    9. BullGuard (You'll have to scroll down the page a bit for the instructions.)
    10. eScan
    11. Avast!
    12. AVG (I think the biggest thing keeping AVG from ranking higher is the large number of false positives and the high impact on system performance)
    13. G Data
    14. Norman (It's convoluted, but the instructions are there)
    15. ESET NOD32
    16. Microsoft Security Essentials

    If you don't have one of the above programs, just do what I did to get the above links. Go to the website for your antivirus software, go to the support section, search for "exclude folder", then follow the instructions to exclude the entire client directory. (Alternatively, you can also Google "nameofantivirus exclude folder".)
    Last edited by SylenThunder; 04-25-2016 at 03:44 PM.

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    [DEDI] How to fix issue with "IOException: Too many open files"

    Now this is an issue you will likely only see on a Linux dedicated server. However, if you have a rather large Random World Map, it is a very real issue. What surprised me even more, was how very little documentation there is on this. That may be due to a smaller number of servers using Linux. Even though Linux is faster with a lower resource overhead, most paid server hosts use Windows for easier management.

    In any case, you've got your server running, everything seems fine. After a while though, it suddenly starts to get a bit sluggish, and has trouble loading map areas. The server may even crash completely, or get to the point where it will not even start up anymore.

    If you check the logs for the server, you will see the following inside of them....
    Code:
    IOException: Too many open files
    at System.IO.FileStream..ctor (System.String path, FileMode mode, FileAccess access, FileShare share, Int32 bufferSize, Boolean anonymous, FileOptions options) [0x00000] in <filename unknown>:0
    at System.IO.FileStream..ctor (System.String path, FileMode mode, FileAccess access, FileShare share) [0x00000] in <filename unknown>:0
    By default, Linux sets the hard file limit at 1024. Basically, you have so many region files that this limit is being exceeded with the client files open, and the other standard processes. (Especially if you are using Allocs mapping tool)

    To correct the issue, you will need to increase your hard and soft file limits.

    Step 1. Run "ulimit -a". You will likely see an ouput similar to this.
    Code:
    core file size (blocks, -c) 0
    data seg size (kbytes, -d) unlimited
    scheduling priority (-e) 0
    file size (blocks, -f) unlimited
    pending signals (-i) 515561
    max locked memory (kbytes, -l) 64
    max memory size (kbytes, -m) unlimited
    open files (-n) 1024
    pipe size (512 bytes, -p) 8
    POSIX message queues (bytes, -q) 819200
    real-time priority (-r) 0
    stack size (kbytes, -s) 8192
    cpu time (seconds, -t) unlimited
    max user processes (-u) 515561
    virtual memory (kbytes, -v) unlimited
    file locks (-x) unlimited
    Step 2. Open /etc/security/limits.conf with your favorite editor. (I like nano, but you can use almost anything.)

    Step 3. Go to the following section of the file where you see this...
    Code:
    #*               soft    core            0
    #root            hard    core            100000
    #*               hard    rss             10000
    #@student        hard    nproc           20
    #@faculty        soft    nproc           20
    #@faculty        hard    nproc           50
    #ftp             hard    nproc           0
    #ftp             -       chroot          /ftp
    #@student        -       maxlogins       4
    Then you will add these two lines of code...
    Code:
    *               soft    nofile            4096    
    *               hard    nofile            8192
    Now the bottom of your file should look like this....
    Code:
    *               soft    nofile            4096    
    *               hard    nofile            8192
    #*               soft    core            0
    #root            hard    core            100000
    #*               hard    rss             10000
    #@student        hard    nproc           20
    #@faculty        soft    nproc           20
    #@faculty        hard    nproc           50
    #ftp             hard    nproc           0
    #ftp             -       chroot          /ftp
    #@student        -       maxlogins       4
    
    # End of file
    Step 4. Reboot the machine/container to apply the new file limit and you should be good to go. Depending on the size of your map, you may need to increase the file limits. At one point I ended up just making mine unlimited because with two RWG servers I was having to double the limit every couple of days.

    Step 5. Run "ulimit -a" again to verify the change. It should now look like the following.
    Code:
    core file size (blocks, -c) 0
    data seg size (kbytes, -d) unlimited
    scheduling priority (-e) 0
    file size (blocks, -f) unlimited
    pending signals (-i) 515561
    max locked memory (kbytes, -l) 64
    max memory size (kbytes, -m) unlimited
    open files (-n) 4096
    pipe size (512 bytes, -p) 8
    POSIX message queues (bytes, -q) 819200
    real-time priority (-r) 0
    stack size (kbytes, -s) 8192
    cpu time (seconds, -t) unlimited
    max user processes (-u) 515561
    virtual memory (kbytes, -v) unlimited
    file locks (-x) unlimited
    Now you should be good to go!

  13. #13
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    [SP] Where are my saves at?

    In the Windows client they would normally be located in the following folder.

    Windows XP (because some people still use it, even though no one supports it.)
    C:\Documents and Settings\<User>\AppData\Roaming\7DaysToDie

    Windows Vista/7/8/10
    C:\Users\<User>\AppData\Roaming\7DaysToDie
    C:\Games\Steam\SteamApps\common\7 Days to Die\Data\Worlds\WORLD_NAME

    NOTE: On the Windows PC's the AppData folder is hidden. You can access it directly for the logged in user by entering %appdata% into the address bar of Windows Explorer.

    Linux
    <User>/.local/share/7DaysToDie
    <Install Path>\7 Days to Die\Data\Worlds\WORLD_NAME

    MacOS
    <User>/Library/Application Support/7DaysToDie
    <Install Path>\7 Days to Die\Data\Worlds\WORLD_NAME

    These locations are assuming standard client installs.


    In the "7DaysToDie\SavesLocal" folder, you will find your locally stored data from the MP servers you have logged into and played.

    In the "7DaysToDie\Saves" folder, you will find your local profile and SP save games.

    In the "7 Days to Die\Data\Worlds" folder, you will find the saved world data for each map. The folders are named on the Generated map name.
    Last edited by SylenThunder; 02-16-2019 at 04:42 PM.

  14. #14
    Community Moderator SylenThunder's Avatar
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    A guide to migrating save files.

    DISCLAIMER: Each new build (Stable or Experimental) requires that you start a new save. If you are playing an older save on a new build, you should expect to encounter problems/bugs. Starting with a15, it may be possible to continue from one stable build to the next, but you will not experience any new content. (You also may still get errors and bugs.)

    OK, so you want to move your saves from one computer to another. Or from a SP game to a P2P MP game, or to a dedi. Or from dedi to SP, or any number of possible combinations. First, you need to know where the files are. Then you need to know where to put them.

    Now, for the SP games, we already covered the paths above so I'll refrain from repeating that. Those same folder paths will also cover the P2P MP games launched from your local client.

    The location of your dedicated MP save folders will differ though, and it depends largely on how the server was set up and configured.

    Windows 2008-16 server will typically be using the same folder as your local client would in "%appdata%\7DaysToDie". It is possible that they were set up in a different folder such as "\SteamCMD\7_Days_to_Die_server\Saves".

    Linux will differ even more depending on which Linux build you are using, and the way you set up the dedicated server. I personally recommend only using Alloc's dedicated server scripts.

    If you are using Alloc's scripts to create the instance, it will be in the following folder.
    /home/sdtd/instances/<instance name>

    If you know other common save locations, please feel free to PM me and let me know so I can add them.



    Now that you have found your saves, all you need to do is copy the data over.

    If you have a Navezgane map, It will be saved in Saves\Navezgane\<name of save\.
    If you have a Random Gen map, It will be saved in Saves\Random Gen\<name of save\.
    With a17 there is an additional folder in your gameclient directory. 7 Days to Die\Data\Worlds\[WORLD_NAME]

    In the Save folder root of a MP game, there will be a file named "players.xml" which contains basic information about the players and their last login information. It also contains land claim block information if they have placed one. In the folder you will have a "Player" folder which contains the character information, inventory, and personal map for each player on your server. The "Region" folder contains all of the region files that make up the land in the map.

    You will just need to copy the data you wish to migrate out of the original save folder, and into it's new home, following the same structure within the save folders. If you are migrating to a Linux dedi, be sure to check the file permissions after you have moved them over. They should be 644 on the files in the Saves Root, and 755 on all of the other files. Owner:group should be the same as the user account used for the dedi installation. (i.e. sdtd:sdtd if you are using Alloc's install script)
    Last edited by SylenThunder; 01-23-2019 at 01:00 PM.

  15. #15
    Community Moderator SylenThunder's Avatar
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    Installing and Running a Dedicated Server

    OK, this one is going to need a lot more meat to it, but I'll start with the basics.

    First, lets cover the many different ways to run a dedicated server.
    • Installing the dedi build locally through Steam and running it.
    • Installing the dedi build locally via SteamCMD.
    • Setting up a separate PC to host the dedi server. (Windows or Linux are most common)
    • Renting a server in the "cloud". (Most expensive option, usually Windows server)


    Your choice in how you host will largely depend on your hardware and network availability, stability, and how much load you need to support. It doesn't take super fast hardware, but you do need a good amount of RAM, a very stable system, and decent bandwidth.

    My personal favorite is to use a local dedicated machine for the server with Linux. You can pick whatever flavor you like, but I find Ubuntu to be one of the easiest to set up.
    A great thanks to Alloc on this for creating the Server Management Scripts and Server Fixes. Not only does a full setup take less than 15 minutes, but with his fixes you get loads of extra features that are extremely helpful for hosting a full-time dedi server.
    https://7dtd.illy.bz/wiki

    Here is a simple guide to installing the dedicated server on Windows using SteamCMD. (Easy to do on a dedicated box without Steam installed.)
    https://developer.valvesoftware.com/...dicated_Server

    For local install, you can just install the server via your Steam client from the Library > Tools menu. Then you'll follow a similar configuration as is laid out in the above link for SteamCMD.

    Don't forget to open/forward your ports in your modem/router if you are hosting a local dedi.

    Later I will add some more detailed information on setups, and using rented servers. I mostly wanted this done before I forgot about it though.

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